Saturday, December 3, 2016

Getting Started with .Net Core and Docker

I have been working to understand .Net Core and Docker as of late. It is cool technology but a bit of a paradigm shift. I have found a few good resources here and wanted to start recording them in case I needed to come back to them a long this journey.

First step to all of this is to install the .Net Core SDK.

Second step is to get Docker.

Once these are installed you have all the command line you need for awhile as you start moving down this road.

One of the first steps for me was getting my head around what .Net Core is and how it is different then the >net world I have been living in. Here is a great walk through that help me understand this.
First Steps Exploring NET Core and ASPNET Core

For me that finally connected the dots of what was happening now with the .net framework.

The next step was to understand what Docker is going to do for me. I had played and read about it but I needed to get hands-on. To do that I actually ran into another great article.

Deploy an ASP.NET Core Application on Linux with Docker

With those tutorials, I started to understand how to put .Net Core application together and how to take that application and put it into a Docker image and container.

Docker has some good docs to understand a little deeper. For me a little reading on containers and images went a long way. After that as I used the command line to look at images and containers I had locally for Docker as started wonder why and how to use repository names, image ids, and tags. Well a little reading through the Docker docs helped there too.

Friday, September 9, 2016

Powershell, XML and Visual Studio build event

Visual Studio provides a lot of capability, but sometimes you need a little Powershell. I needed to update an XML file in my solution based on the projects build configuration. If the configuration was "Release" setup a node in the XML to be value A. If the configuration was "Debug" setup a node in the XML to be value B. I actually did not realize how easy it is to work with XML within Powershell. I found a nice little start on StackOverflow.

My XML was more complex of course but it is still pretty easy to work with. Here is my post-build event.

"%SystemRoot%\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe" -file ..\..\..\..\Scripts\ToggleXMLValues.ps1 $(ConfigurationName) $(TargetDir)

Then in a Powershell file I wrote some pretty simple code.

param ([string]$configName, [string]$outputDir)

$doc = [xml](Get-Content "$($outputDir)\config\myfile.xml")

if ($configName -eq "Release")
{
 $doc.Configuration.Global.Storages.Storage[0].Url = "URL 1"
}
else
{
 $doc.Configuration.Global.Storages.Storage[0].Url = "Url 2"
}

$doc.save("$($outputDir)\config\myfile.xml")

In my case I had an XML document that looked like this.

<Configuration>
  <Global>
    <Storages>
      <Storage Url="My URL"/>
      <Storage/>
    <Storages>
  </Global>
</Configuration>

With that little bit of code I can now toggle this value whenever I build.

Friday, July 1, 2016

Uniting Testing Expression Predicate with Moq

I recently was setting up a repository in a project with an interface on all repositories that took a predicate. As part of this I needed to mock out this call so I could unit test my code. The vast majority of samples out there for mocking an expression predicate just is It.IsAny<> which is not very helpful as it does not test anything other then verify it got a predicate. What if you actually want to test that you got a certain predicate though? It is actually pretty easy to do but not very straight forward.

Here is what you do for the It.IsAny<> approach in case someone is looking for that.

this.bindingRepository.Setup(c => c.Get(It.IsAny<Expression<Func<UserBinding, bool>>>())) 
.Returns(new List<UserBinding>() { defaultBinding }.AsQueryable());

This example just says to always return a collection of UserBindings that contain “defaultBinding” (which is an object I setup previously).

Here is what it looks like when you want to pass in an expression predicate that actually gets executed and only returns data if it matches something.

For my example I have a predicate that executes against an object collection of type “UserBinding.” The part to understand here is you are not passing to the Moq setup an expression. You are telling Moq to compile whatever expression it is given and see if that expression finds a match against the given object your provided. So in the example, does the expression passed in find a hit when executed against my “defaultBinding” object. If so return whatever data you want to return (in my case I am returning a collection of UserBindings as a queryable).

var defaultBinding = new UserBinding { Binding = new Binding { Name = "Default binding" }, Domain = "test.com" };
 
 
this.bindingRepository.Setup(c => c.Get(It.Is<Expression<Func<UserBinding, bool>>>(y => y.Compile()(defaultBinding))))
.Returns(new List<UserBinding>() { defaultBinding }.AsQueryable());

That is it. Now you can test expression predicates and return different out put based on the expression you are expecting to be passed in.